From The Blog

Color Balance

If you shoot in AUTO mode you can not change your color balance. The camera is choosing it for you. In most of the other modes you can choose a white...

If you shoot in AUTO mode you can not change your color balance. The camera is choosing it for you. In most of the other modes you can choose a white balance for your shot. And if you shoot in RAW quality, you can even change it later with no loss of information (there’s no compression) in your file.

White balance (some call it color balance) is nothing more than the way your shot is tinted with color. It has nothing to do with exposure… things like ISO, shutter speed, or aperture. It is simply a personal choice on how you like the color cast in your pictures. Most of the time it is a choice between cool (blue) and warm (yellow/orange). (See the photos below)

If you’re shooting under fluorescent lights which are yellow/green, the camera can add the opposite colors to make the shot look a bit more normal. Tungsten, or incandescent, is primarily for shooting indoors if your scene is lit by regular old light bulbs. This choice will add some blue to counter the orange-ish light bulbs. Daylight, cloudy, and shade choices might add some yellow/orange to warm up your photo due to all the blue your picture picks up from the sky.

What if you choose the wrong one? The disk of software that came with your camera, or programs like Photoshop can fix the problem… as can the place where you take the shots to be printed.

What do I use? I virtually never use AUTO functions on my camera including AWB (Auto White Balance). They get close, but not close enough. I shoot in Raw and generally choose Cloudy, Incandescent, or Fluorescent, depending on the light I’m in. ~Gene

Tungsten Color Balance Outdoors

Daylight Color Balance